Urban Elementz - Blog

  • Delicious Digitizing!

    By Natalie Gorman and Jessica Schick

     

    Did you know that just because you can find the same edge-to-edge pantograph design on multiple sites, it doesn’t mean that all digital and paper pantographs are created equal?

    How so?

    Let’s first talk about how the pantograph "cake is baked.”  A designer draws a design with a trusty pencil and paper. Digitizers then trade in pencil and paper for mouse and monitor, and virtually recreate the continuous line drawing from start to endpoint.

    Oh – how we wish we could just scan in a drawing and – voila – the design in done! Instead, we meticulously work on each design to assure everything that’s stitched by your computerized quilting system is impeccable. What you see in our online images is what you get on your quilt. No additives or preservatives!

    The Perfect Pantograph Recipe

    Every single detail that is digitally drawn will stitch when you use the design. If the design looks messy with wobbles, inaccurate points, egg shaped circles, flat spots, and rows that don’t interlock, that's what you'll get. When you’ve worked so hard to piece together straight seams and perfect points, messy quilting is more disastrous that spilling red while on a white dress.

    Below are two versions of the same design, Sonata (by Jessica Schick*), showing two examples of digitizing:
    * Example 2 digitized by Jessica Schick/Urban Elementz

     

    Example 1:

    A - Feathers have flat spots, angles and divots
    B - Curls are uneven and appear squished
    C - Wonky curves that will stitch wobbly
    D - The leaves have rounded angles/tips instead of sharp points
    E - When rows are put together, there are gaps

     

    Example 2:

    A. Curls and feathers are rounded and smooth
    B. Sharp points
    C. Smooth lines and curves free of divots and wobbles
    D. Parallel curves for clean nesting
    E. Fully fills the spaces between rows

     

    So while you might be able to get designs from a number of places, we are committed to providing you the cleanest, most carefully digitized designs possible. Like a 5 star restaurant, we carefully prepare every ingredient of the design. From the smoothness of the lines, to the way the designs evenly fill space, every detail is going to be stunning. Your quilt will be delicious.

  • Stash Guilt

    By Jane Hardy Miller

    I've been thinking about the fabric stash phenomenon lately, mostly because I'm trying to work from my own and minimize my fabric purchases. (Spoiler alert: It doesn't work.) This is partly due to age, mine as well as some of the fabrics', and partly due to space. My own stash has seemingly of its own volition subscribed to the Storage Corollary of the Peter Principle: The amount of stored goods will expand to fill all available space. So I'm trying to make quilts from some of the fabric I have. Luckily I make a lot of scrap quilts so the smaller pieces that I can't bear to toss at least have the possibility of future use. But that's not really the problem; the problem is that even scrap quilts require a unifying factor. Sometimes that can just be value placement, but sometimes you need more of one fabric, and when you're consistently working from your stash you use up the bigger pieces first. The biggest pieces, those large enough for backs, are the easiest to use because the backs don't have to actually match the tops—they just have to sort of blend, and "sort of" can be a very loose term. But the ¾ to 1 yard pieces disappear fairly quickly, or at least are whittled down into smaller, less versatile chunks. In time theoretically all the fabric will be tiny pieces, but even then I could make postage stamp quilts. Continue reading

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