quilting

  • The Best of ...

    Welcome back to our new series called The Best Of ... !

    Every month we'll introduce to  you one of our designers, and they'll share their very Best's.  This March are thrilled to acquaint you with, Leisha Farnsworth and her "best of"!

    Leisha Farnsworth
    Best Quilting Tool ...
    My favorite quilting tool is my own circle set rulers, called Circle2, which come in a set of 6.
    Best Inspiration ...
    I get inspired everywhere I look. From color to texture to fabrics to patterns, inspiration is out there if you look for it.
    Best time to quilt ...

    I would love to only quilt during the day and be done...however evenings after dinner, I get the most uninterrupted work done.

    Best project ever ...

    I’m working on a hexagon flower quilt using the English paper piecing method, which I started back in the summer of 2015.  I have recently finished everything but the edge pieces.  Now it’s time to lay it out and sew the flowers together.
    Best Day Off ...
    I love Sunday’s every week.  I don’t work on Sunday’s so I can recharge by going to church and spending time with my family, which helps me continue to do what I love.
    Best advice I’ve ever been given ...
    Take care of yourself, so you can give to those who need you.  And do be afraid of using the word “no”.
    Best advice I can give ...
    Don’t let someone ... anyone ... tell you that you can’t do something.  If you have dreams, go for them!  Figure out what you need to do, to make them a possibility.  If it gets hard or you fail, don’t give up.
    Best Road Trip ...
    One of my favorite road trips was from northern Virginia (where I was living at the time), to upstate New York, to Boston, to New York City, and then back home.
    Best thing about quilting ...
    For me the most rewarding thing about quilting is seeing how much my clients love the quilts they made, after they are quilted.
    Best Place to Visit ...
    I’ve visited places all over the USA and a few places outside of the country... however my all time favorite place would be at a lake that is about an hour away from where I live.

    Birchwood Pantograph by Patricia E. Ritter and Leisha Farnsworth

    Although Leisha has been sewing since she was a child, her love for making quilts started in her early 20's.  In the summer of 2005, she started machine quilting her own quilts.  Soon the word got out and she started quilting for others.  In 2014 Leisha started co-designing paper and digital machine quilting designs, with Patricia Ritter from Urban Elementz, which has been an incredible opportunity.  Even with 13+ years of machine quilting experience, she still loves learning new things.
    Leisha has also taught one on one and group machine quilting classes, and loves teaching her students the techniques that have helped her in her machine quilting career.  She recently joined the Honest Fabric design team, and released her own circle ruler set of 6, called "Circle2".
    While quilting is her passion, she also enjoys water skiing, playing the piano, cooking, and spending time with her family.  She has 10 nieces and nephews, and being their aunt is her very favorite thing.  Leisha lives in beautiful Cache Valley, Utah, and thanks God for the talents He has blessed her with.  She is excited to see what comes next.  Her three best selling pantographs are Marmalade, Birchwood and Bubble Wrap - Double Take.
    *NOTE:  You can find Leisha's ruler's on her website quiltingit.com.
    Marmalade Pantograph by Patricia E. Ritter and Leisha Farnsworth
  • Hooked - How did y'all get here?

    by Sarah Curry

    Sarah Curry

    I don’t mean Here-here – I mean Quilty-here –Hooked-here; totally awash in books (usually bought for the one quilt with those “oooh” colors, teeny-tiny patches, and curves and angles inside); astonished and embarrassed at how those four Fat Quarters of fabric you bought that said, “Oooooh” apparently bred like rabbits (like those old wire coat hangers used to do) during the night, and you suddenly have a Stash.  Hooh, boy. 

    I guess I got the Q-gene from both sides, because both my maternal and paternal grandmothers were quilters – as was my mama before me. Mama’s mother (Nana) was built like a Pouter Pigeon - soft to cuddle up to.  Little wire spectacles. A cardboard box in the closet that held kid-stuff – old jewelry, most of a deck of cards, battered pot lid. She baked with cinnamon. And she made quilts.  Completely UTILITARIAN quilts, made of men’s WOOLEN suits and all were rectangles and squares. And they were tied with red yarn. H-E-A-V-V-V-Y. 

    Grandma Curry, on the other hand, lived in an old Victorian house in West Texis (not a typo – I spell it like it’s pronounced).  I remember the gables, the wraparound porch, the gingerbread, the “hidden” rooms, and that “children are to be seen and not heard". Grandma Curry looked like the Wicked Witch of the West in “The Wizard of Oz” (squinchy eyes, hook nose, thin lips), and as far as the grandkids were concerned she was just about that distant and scary.  She made “Grandmother’s Flower Garden” and “Lone Star” quilts with patches that were about the size of a nickel - finished.  All cut with scissors, hand-pieced, and hand-quilted. E-X-Q-U-I-S-I-T-E. 

    Mama was a quilter, too, although she didn’t really enjoy the cardboard-template-pencil-scissors routine.  And her sense of color wasn’t the best.  But she quilted. Also hand-pieced, and hand-quilted.  And WASHED those quilts, every weekend, with the sheets. Not one of her old quilts survived.  But they were definitely clean! 

    By the time my boys graduated from high school and went to college (thank gawdess!  I got’erdun!), I was SO-O-O-O ready to begin the next phase of my life (after a 48-hour nap). That's when Mama burst into the living room one afternoon, laden with all sorts of bags and suitcases and more bags and an ironing board and what looked suspiciously like one of Daddy’s old tackle boxes. Mama travelled like that. She had “discovered” the rotary cutter and mat and was READY to make a quilt for the “Sweet Darlin’ Angel Baby Boy” who didn’t yet have one. 

    So the next morning off we shot to the quilt shop. By noon, we found appropriate fabric for a 6-log “Rail Fence” (blues for a hockey player – no florals), with 1 ½” finished “logs".  What?  Can’t start yet?  Gotta wash the fabric (with salt & vinegar)?  Geez.  Press same.  I became the “cutter”.  Woo-HOO!  Lookit how FAST that is (still don’t understand what I’m doing, but that’s OK)!  As I cut strips (fast), Mama sewed (slowly – she insisted on PINNING every seam).  Then I pressed the strips (Mama was always behind, still pinning).  Then I cut some more.  Mama pinned and sewed.  I pressed and cut.  And had a WONDERFUL time! 

    Finally, about midnight, Mama lurched up and announced that I could quit cracking the damn’ bullwhip, ‘cause she was tired and going to bed, and she did.  I did not.  How COULD I?  The pattern was REALLY starting to show!!!!  YOWZA!!!!!  So, when Mama arose the next morning, bleary-eyed and demanding coffee, there was a finished quilt top laid out on the couch.  Every time she told the story, Mama never forgot to mention the fact that I had pressed those seams “everwhichaway, bless her heart.”  Hmph.   

    And I was hooked.  Beyond just “hooked,” I had bumbled onto the fourth passion of my life. I haven’t a clue how much money I’ve spent on that stash (from which I am working, these days, almost exclusively), or even how many quilts I’ve made.  I did make 6 (SIX!) “Rail Fence” quilts before I “graduated” to “Double Irish Chain.”  Made 6 of those before I “graduated” to another level, and I reckon I’ve averaged a quilt every 2-3 months for 30 years.  Yeah, it’s a Passion.   

    So. That’s how *I* got hooked.  Passionate.  How did YOU find quilting? 

    ...

    Our glorious guest blogger, Sarah Curry...

    "3d-generation quilter, 3d-generation grammarian/teacher, born and raised in Hobbs, NM. NMSU, twin sons (and when they started coming in litters, I was done with that sort of project), happily divorced since 1977, UNM Law School, civil litigation for nearly 20 years, now retired, 4 grandsons,  but still quilting – these days, almost exclusively from a legendary stash.  AllieCat and I grow old together, but she’s still an excellent “Quilt Inspector/Block Re-arranger”."

  • The Best Of ...

    Welcome to our new series called The Best Of ... !

    Every month we'll introduce to  you one of our designers, and they'll share their very Best's.  To kick off our first month, we are thrilled to acquaint you with, Valerie Smith and her "best of" list.

    Valerie Smith

     

      Best Quilting Tool: Seam Ripper. We all make mistakes!
       Best Inspiration: Quilt Shows!
       Best Time to Quilt: Early in the morning. I am an early bird and get my best work down 5 or 6 in the morning.
       Best Project Ever: Whatever I am working on at the time.
       Best Day Off: The day after a big "whoops". We all need breaks even from the things we love. Then get back to it!
       Best Advice You Ever Received: "That's nothing anyone on a horse galloping by would notice" - Gal from my old quilt guild.  Let up on your mistakes and enjoy your beautiful creation.
       Best Advice Ever Given: Do what brings you joy!
       Best Road Trip: Hmmm ... my best road trip is yet to come! I don't travel much with small children, but I did take a trip to Gatlinburg, TN.  That was a lot of fun.
       Best Thing About Quilting: You get something cozy when you're done.
       Best Place to Visit: The quilt shop!
    Valerie has been quilting for more than 30 years, and many of her designs have been published in national publications.  She lives in the northeast corner of Ohio, on the shores of Lake Eerie, with her husband and four children.  Two of her most popular pantographs designs are Lather, Rinse, Repeat and Deja Vu.
  • New Quilting Toy

    by Brian Partin

    One of the first things that drew me to quilting was appliqué. I remember seeing a very simple primitive quilt at the Dade County Youth Fair. It was a red plaid angel quilt, and each angel was made up of a heart body, round head and a halo. I wanted to buy the quilt, but I couldn’t afford it. I kept thinking, “I could make that”. After taking beginning quilting, an Appliqué class was next on my list, and yes, I did make that angel quilt.

    Ever since then, appliqué has been one of my favorite types of projects. It addresses my need to be creative better than anything else. The only down side is the length of time it takes to crank out an appliqué quilt as opposed to pretty much any other type of project. The holiday and season quilts that I want to make keep stacking up, and the time keeps slipping away. Not to mention the long list of family members and friends that think they deserve a quilt from me as well. Something had to give.

    Purchasing laser cut and pre-fused appliqué soon became my "go-to" for putting together an appliqué project. The precision cutting made the shapes clearly identifiable, and the project's a breeze to snap together. Just peel, place and press. I only wished that I could get them in exactly the size that I wanted for my project. And wouldn’t it be great if I could get them out of the fabric that I already own to match collections that I have already bought?

    Well, it turns out I can. Enter fabric cutting machines. These new cutting machines allow me to buy SVG files and cut the designs at home, using my very own fabric, in any size that the machine will cut. It did take a bit of a learning curve, but that is a part of the journey, isn’t it?

    My Quilting Toy by Brian Partin
    Here are a few things I've learned so far:

    1. Designs don't always open the size that is specified, but I can scale and rotate them anyway I want. Pretty cool ... right?

    2. I have to “select all” so that I can ungroup the design. This allows me to separate the components of the design so that I can cut the pieces from various fabrics. The machine also cuts better when the cutting is separated a bit from each piece.

    3. Since I am cutting the fabric face down, I want to flip the design to keep it facing the right direction and the lettering readable, if there is any.

    4. Any items that are showing on the "mat" will be cut. Those that I drag off the "mat" will not cut. I can drag off items now while they are the right size and cut them later in a different fabric. I just go back to the design after cutting and switch the items that I want to cut next.

    5. When I load my fabric on the mat, I place the right side of the fabric face down on the mat. Using a lot of pressure I hand press that fabric onto the mat to make sure it is flat. If it is loose it will get pulled up while cutting and make a mess. I have pre-fused the Steam-A-Seam II onto the back of the fabric, and make sure that it is freshly ironed and the paper backing is still tight on the fabric. I will lift the paper, and re-iron it flat if there are any creases in the paper that might catch on the cutting knife during cutting.

    6. I have read that some people soak their fabric in Terial Magic, available at Amazon or at your local quilt store, to stiffen the fabric, but I have yet to try it.

    My Quilting Toy by Brian Partin

    Who knew that after quilting for 27 years that I'd find something totally new to learn? And it's a good thing because I think learning new things makes life more interesting, and it also makes me more interesting too.

  • Snip! Snip!

     

    By Sarah Curry

    They’re still there, dammit – a veritable herd of chain-pieced bias squares, draped across the ironing board, waiting to be clipped apart, pressed and trimmed into perfect 2 ½” squares. They glare at me as I pass through the sewin’ room on the way to the bathroom, like a bunch of sullen toddlers who’ve been put in time out.

    This is supposed to be a quilt for my younger Seattle grandson, soon enough a teenager. When I asked about fabric colors for his next quilt, Tyler wanted teal and hot pink. HUH? HOT PINK?! Visions of go-go boots and Laugh-In danced in my head as I processed the notion of a couple of big ol’ hairy-legged jocks wanting hot pink in a high school/college quilt. I couldn’t process it until I learned that the Adidas athletic shoe company had selected hot pink as its color of the year. Oh. Well then, teal and hot pink it is.

    I think I’m one of the few rare exceptions who don’t even think about starting a quilt specifically for someone.

    I begin a quilt just to see what develops.

    I like the old patterns with the fun names, like hovering hawks, log cabin, and puss in a corner - frankly, those patterns don’t have anything smaller than a 45-degree angle.  Those fancy ones are lovely to look at, but I cuss too often and easily as it is and I don’t want to work that hard. I am a big fan of the scrappy look and with a lusciously legendary stash, I have a nice variety to pull from.

     

    When I begin a quilt, I generally drag all the purples (or whatever color I’m feeling that day) off the shelf and start pressing, chopping, and dicing. I get completely besotted as the pattern and colors mesh together and become real. Somewhere along the process, the quilt decides how big it’s going to be, gives itself a name, and chooses to whom it wants to belong. What’s weird is that 95% of my quilts have that sort of beginning. Am I the only one?

    Another irking delay in this quilts progress is that I can’t stand as long to press, cut, chop and dice; can’t sit as long to do some mindless chain-piecing; I have a lot more trouble getting down and up from the floor than I once did (my days of measuring how big a quilt really is by how many beers it takes to pin-baste it – a 6-beer quilt is a king-sized quilt – are limited). I’ve realized that I will not be one of those who “go gentle into that good night.” I’ll have to be dragged, kickin’ and screamin,’ and cussin’ all the way, because everything takes me twice as long now, to do half as much. Probably never was very gentle, anyway.

    I digress. I’d better haul my butt out of this chair and get to clipping, pressing, and trimming or those evil toddlers are going to keep on glaring at me with their sulky, squinty little eyes.

     

     

  • Dare to Dream Big!

    By Patricia Ritter and Julia Mathis

     

    Dreaming big is a motivational push of positive encouragement, an incentive propelling growth and prosperity meant to freshen up your everyday – any takers? If answered with a fat ole’ yes – then hold on to your hat! All of us at Urban Elementz are eager and delighted to release our Dream Big Quilting Designs for long-arm and domestic machine quilters.

    Hoffman California Fabrics designs and manufactures innovative,  imaginative fabrics, including their beautiful digitally printed Dream Big floral panel. This product is STUNNING (in all caps)! The flower seems to burst from the fabric, stretching into each corner of the panel offering itself up as the perfect textural canvas for quilting. And has become all the rage of quilters all over the world!

    And just like every other quilter, we were bitten by the bug!

    So what did we do?

    We came up with twelve amazing Dream Big Quilting Designs. To encourage creativity and unique personalization each design is unique in arrangement and composition but configured to be "mixed and matched". Get more than one and release a current of possibilities and create your vivacious, exquisitely distinct, Dream Big quilt.

    Thank you for providing us with constant inspiration and as always, we love your feedback.

    Head on over to our Facebook @urbanelementzdesigns and our Instagram @urban.elementz to stay updated with our full week of deals.

    Living the dream never gets old.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

6 Item(s)

Please wait...